podcaster, writer, photographer

CNN

CNN

By Cindy Y. Rodriguez Which is it, Hispanic or Latino? If there's one thing everyone should know about Hispanics in the United States, it's that this rapidly growing minority has an undefined identity crisis. Why? Because of the confusion surrounding what to call people whose ethnic background is from Latin American and Spanish-speaking countries. Some even feel 100% American or 100% Latino -- or Hispanic, depending to whom you're talking to. 

By Cindy Y. Rodriguez

Which is it, Hispanic or Latino?

If there's one thing everyone should know about Hispanics in the United States, it's that this rapidly growing minority has an undefined identity crisis.

Why? Because of the confusion surrounding what to call people whose ethnic background is from Latin American and Spanish-speaking countries. Some even feel 100% American or 100% Latino -- or Hispanic, depending to whom you're talking to. 

By Cindy Y. Rodriguez Fewer Latinos will speak Spanish, more non-Latinos will, report says It's no secret that more and more people are speaking español in the United States, but what you probably didn't know is that in the future more of those Spanish speakers will not be Hispanic. That's right -- as immigrant families become more established here, future generations will follow the pattern of previous immigrants from Europe and Asia and stop using their native language.

By Cindy Y. Rodriguez

Fewer Latinos will speak Spanish, more non-Latinos will, report says

It's no secret that more and more people are speaking español in the United States, but what you probably didn't know is that in the future more of those Spanish speakers will not be Hispanic.

That's right -- as immigrant families become more established here, future generations will follow the pattern of previous immigrants from Europe and Asia and stop using their native language.

By Cindy Y. Rodriguez How a Mexican snack became an American staple As a non-sports aficionado, my attraction to game day festivities has been solely food focused. So naturally, I noticed how potato chips have taken less and less space on the snack table to make room for tortilla chips and guacamole. Although potato chips continue to be the top-selling salted snack in terms of pounds sold, tortilla chips have been increasing in sales at a faster pace than potato chips, especially during this time of year, according to Tom Dempsey, CEO of the Snack Food Association. 

By Cindy Y. Rodriguez

How a Mexican snack became an American staple

As a non-sports aficionado, my attraction to game day festivities has been solely food focused. So naturally, I noticed how potato chips have taken less and less space on the snack table to make room for tortilla chips and guacamole.

Although potato chips continue to be the top-selling salted snack in terms of pounds sold, tortilla chips have been increasing in sales at a faster pace than potato chips, especially during this time of year, according to Tom Dempsey, CEO of the Snack Food Association. 

 
By Cindy Y. Rodriguez How not to celebrate Cinco de Mayo If you didn't already know, Cinco de Mayo is a bigger deal in the United States than in Mexico. Here, this unofficial holiday is almost as popular as, oh, St. Patrick's Day -- which means it's unfortunately become a drinking holiday. So much so that it's been nicknamed, Cinco de Drinko and even Gringo de Mayo. Eek. Actually today commemorates Mexico's victory against the French during the Battle of Puebla in 1862, and according to research by UCLA professor David Hayes-Bautista, it isn't a Mexican holiday at all but rather an American one created by Latinos in California during the Civil War.

By Cindy Y. Rodriguez

How not to celebrate Cinco de Mayo

If you didn't already know, Cinco de Mayo is a bigger deal in the United States than in Mexico. Here, this unofficial holiday is almost as popular as, oh, St. Patrick's Day -- which means it's unfortunately become a drinking holiday. So much so that it's been nicknamed, Cinco de Drinko and even Gringo de Mayo. Eek.

Actually today commemorates Mexico's victory against the French during the Battle of Puebla in 1862, and according to research by UCLA professor David Hayes-Bautista, it isn't a Mexican holiday at all but rather an American one created by Latinos in California during the Civil War.

By Cindy Y. Rodriguez Does Hollywood have a Latino problem? The headlines for the new season of ABC's "The Bachelor" read: "The Bachelor returns with its first Latino," "Hola, Juan Pablo," and "Expect 'lots of Latino' fun." And millions are tuning in to watch Juan Pablo Galavis, a 32-year-old former professional soccer player who is American-born but grew up in Venezuela. The "sexy, hot-blooded Latino" is one of many stereotypes that is prevalent in Hollywood. And, as the Hispanic population continues to grow, more and more attention is being drawn to how Latinos are represented in television and film.

By Cindy Y. Rodriguez

Does Hollywood have a Latino problem?

The headlines for the new season of ABC's "The Bachelor" read: "The Bachelor returns with its first Latino," "Hola, Juan Pablo," and "Expect 'lots of Latino' fun."

And millions are tuning in to watch Juan Pablo Galavis, a 32-year-old former professional soccer player who is American-born but grew up in Venezuela. The "sexy, hot-blooded Latino" is one of many stereotypes that is prevalent in Hollywood. And, as the Hispanic population continues to grow, more and more attention is being drawn to how Latinos are represented in television and film.

By Cindy Y. Rodriguez Mexican-American boy's national anthem sparks racist comments An 11-year-old boy's rendition of the national anthem at Game 3 of the NBA finals brought the usual appreciative applause Tuesday, but outside AT&T Center in San Antonio, his performance brought a darker reaction from some posters on social media -- and eventually an online backlash against their racist comments. Here's a sampling of some of the unkind tweets that went flying around the Internet about Sebastien de la Cruz:

By Cindy Y. Rodriguez

Mexican-American boy's national anthem sparks racist comments

An 11-year-old boy's rendition of the national anthem at Game 3 of the NBA finals brought the usual appreciative applause Tuesday, but outside AT&T Center in San Antonio, his performance brought a darker reaction from some posters on social media -- and eventually an online backlash against their racist comments.

Here's a sampling of some of the unkind tweets that went flying around the Internet about Sebastien de la Cruz: